Santosh Sivan (born 8 February 1964) is a film director, producer, and cinematographer, of the Indian cinema. Santosh is an FTII (Film and Television Institute of India) graduate and has so far has done 41 documentaries and 45 feature films. Not only is he a founding associate of the Indian Society of Cinematographers (ISC), but also is the bigger of the highest number of Director of Photography (DOP) award in India. Sivan is the first ever Cinematographer in the Asia-Pacific area to achieve an American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) fellowship.

He has as many as five National Film Awards for cinematography to his name, four of which are for Best Feature Film Cinematography. Till date, he has achieved 11 National Film Awards for his outstanding work in Indian cinema. He is the son of the prominent cinematographer and director Sivan. His elder brother is filmmaker Sangeeth Sivan and younger brother Sanjeev Sivan. His was taught painting and music by her grandmother. His grandmother frequently narrated the mythological stories of the themes of the paintings of Raja Ravi Varma.

The postures and colors of these paintings guided his creative imagination. During his travels to remote areas in South India with his father, he had the opportunities to listen to the native folklore. Santosh did his graduation in Mar Ivanios College, Trivandrum, India. He received the National Award for best Cinematographer for the films Dil Se (Hindi/1999), Iruvar (Tamil/1998), Kalapani (Malayalam / 1996), Mohiniyattam (Malayalam / 1991), Perumthachan (Malayalam/1991). The Japanese Society of Cinematographers honored Santosh, and he is a Jury member for the Busan Film Festival.

He is also a "mentor" to the students of "Mira Nair's Maisha Film Lab". He is a director of the Sivan Foundation of photography. Pune Film Institute once had him as a council member.

Sanjay Tripathi Hindi Actor

Sanjay Tripathi

With this debut directorial venture, ‘Club 60’, Sanjay Tripathi has broken into the consciousness of Indian movie enthusiasts. The movie featured legendary actors such as the Late Farooque Sheikh, the evergreen Satish Shah and Sarika. It was a fresh take on a subject seldom touched upon: depression. While the movie might’ve not grossed a lot in terms of box office sales, it was so well appreciated by audiences and critics alike that it was able to attain a respectable box office collection at the end of its 100-day run, which Tripathi felt happened thanks to word of mouth. Tripathi didn’t take the conventional path to becoming a director. He graduated from Delhi University in Physics and his career begun as a science journalist for ‘Computers Today’, an outlet of India Today. Later, he decided to pursue his directorial passions by directing shows like ‘Turning Point’ and then started to make significant strides by creating and producing various celebrated documentaries and shows for BBC, National Geographic and Discovery Channel. Someone whose forte was science fiction, his show ‘Hum’ attained both critical and commercial success in 2011. ‘Club 60’ was made with considerable hard work and it took a lot of dedication from Tripathi’s end to make this movie happen despite budgetary constraints. In a country where intellectually uplifting or fresh, experimental cinema is not abundant nor encouraged due to an investment opportunity, it is good to see that talented directors like Sanjay Tripathi are coming to the fore and are trying to deliver something visually refreshing in contrast to the same old drab that is released in Indian theatres for the most part of the year.

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