I, Me Aur Main-trinity of identities adding more confusion! Movie Review

  • By: nettv4u.com
  • Review for the film: "I, Me Aur Main"
  • Runtime: 1 Hour 45 Minutes
  • Certificate: UA
  • Released: 01-03-2013
  • Genre: Drama
2.5 / 5.0

In spite of its rather odd sounding name which leaves one figuring out what it stands for, the film at least has glossy exteriors with a typical coffee table like characters who normally adorn the Mumbai entertainment world with their less than conventional lifestyles. It is a film about their ego and psychological clashes and how they get settled ultimately. For debutant director, it was a challenging theme to take up, but he seems to have made a commendable effort in spite of getting caught between the conventional melodramatic approach and a more underplayed one.

Plot: Significantly, the story line and script are credited to two female identities in this multi-heroine movie. The central character is, however, Ishaan, portrayed by John Abraham, who to the world outside is a handsome and suave music producer, but is a different character in private life. In spite of his public image and following, Ishaan is seen always tied to the apron strings of either his doting mother Nisha, played by Zarina Wahab with a veteran’s poise; or his ever counselling elder sister Shivani, a role portrayed by Mini Mathur. Funnily, while Ishaan acts as the obedient ward, at the same time he is in a live-in relationship with his girlfriend, a hemming and hawing Anushka, enacted by Chitrangada Singh.

One day, due to his dithering nature and his inability to make up his mind on marriage, Anushka shuts the door on Ishaan’s, ending their relationship once and for all. That brings Gauri his new neighbour into the scene, and before long Ishaan falls in love with this female played by a Prachi Desai, appearing in this film in a major role on the big screen after her successes in “Rock On” and “Bol Bachchan”. Continuing with his miseries, Ishaan now falls out with his domineering boss, an arrogant female played by Ria Sen, forming the last link of the triumvirate of heroines in the film. On Gauri’s encouragement Ishaan launches a music company of his own, while on the other side, things start happening with the news of Anushka’s pregnancy coming in on the same day as his big music launch. It dawns on Ishaan that he should stand by Anushka at this hour and is present there at the time of birth of the baby girl. Realising the situation, Gauri leaves for Paris on a scholarship and after eight months Ishaan and his baby girl Diya meet Gauri when she returns. In a twist in the tale, Anushka is seen happily married elsewhere, and she makes no bones of her decision to have walked out of Ishaan’s life.

Apart from its glossy exteriors, the film can also boast of an interesting plot with some snatches of good acting. From a distinct break from his usual macho roles, John Abraham tries his best to look credible as a yet-to-grow-up young man type of role. The roles of the female leads are lopsided, with Raima Sen missing out of the action mostly. In spite of good looks, the heroines come out bland in the emotional moments. Another aspect that needs pointing out is the fact that although it is supposed to be a film about a music producer, due importance does not seem to have been given to the songs in the film. This is even after roping in four sets of music directors for the film and the generous use of rip-offs from overseas chartbusters. Overall, after being the assistant director in some notable films, Kapil Sharma’s graduation into independent direction though not a washout, could have been better.

Verdict: This may not fall in the category of a must see movie, but one that you may not regret once you have walked into the theatre, especially if you are one who is moved by the gloss and styling that many Bollywood films seem to be using as their staple diet.